Holiday Gifts For The Book Lover

A few days ago, I walked into a Blackstone Bookstore in a small town in England – which shall remain nameless for now – since I am here doing research for another story – and I have to say, I was caught completely off guard by the amount of foot traffic the store receives. At first I thought it was because of the rain outside and/or the cafe upstairs, but when I stayed about an hour to observe and appreciate the volume of books categorized so perfectly throughout the store, I realized, people were actually there buying paperbacks or hardbacks.  It is definitely due to the holiday shopping, you might say, but after speaking to the clerks behind the check out counter, I was told  the store was busy most of the time and very busy over the weekends.  Oh what joy I felt.

Also, here’s a list of my next reads

and just in case you have a book-warm or a book-lover or an avid reader in your life – here’s a great link to some interesting gift ideas

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The Most Beautiful Idea Yet…

…is one I came across while reading the latest blog entry here. And it made me smile, the kind of happy expression I can hardly describe. But if you’ve been there, you’ll understand. I think I will frame this quote and keep it visible just in case of a setback or disillusionment of sorts.

 

Reading Two Opinions At Once

My favorite past time is reading-online stories about Parisian life – from ex-pats to locals – sharing their opinions, observations and trivia about the city of love. This blog in particular sparking an interest after I read the following bullet points author Amanda Randone penned on Coveteur:

Randone states the following: 1. French-Girl style is a myth. 2. Speaking French Isn’t Enough. 3. There is a ‘social code’ in Paris and you don’t want to get it wrong. 4. Take the Bus.  5. Prepare For Lots of Question.  And she backs up her observations here and more here   just in case, like me, you often dream about moving to Paris.

On the flip side, I came across this bit of reading America The Anxious and have ordered a copy. While I wait for my paperback to be tossed from the bottom of the stairs up to my front door by ‘delivery company to be left nameless’ – I ask – have you read the book and if so – what do you think?  The cover says it all.

The idea is one I’ve tossed around for a few years, but haven’t had the gut to put it in print. I simply keep my ideas in an online journal and save-draft it.

Here’s what author – Ruth Whippman Indexed for our reading pleasure.

 

 

IndieBound September 2017 Book Recommends

Each month IndieBound puts out a list of books to read, and I race to my local mom/pop bookstore, literally brick and mortar run down shop in San Francisco, and grab the flyer so I can plan out my next set of stories to tackle. And so, here it is, my list from their list:

“Little Fires Everywhere is a breathtaking novel about art, motherhood, and truth. Mia and her daughter, Pearl, move to the perfectly planned community of Shaker Heights as the last stop on their nomadic adventure, bringing some much-needed permanence to teenager Pearl’s life. They both find friendship, but the connections they create with their landlord’s family will soon change all of their lives. Impossible to put down or stop thinking about. A great read.” {source}

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The World of Tomorrow is so wise and so ambitious in scope, with characters so complex, sympathetic, and real, that you will be hard-pressed to set it aside at a reasonable hour. Mathews’ success in rendering the physicality of New York City just before WWII, the complexities of the Irish-American experience, and the first awful rumblings of the Holocaust, along with all the details of class, race, family, tragedy, comedy, heroics, and jazz, make this a truly immersive reading experience. With beautiful prose, a plot that manages strand after strand of narrative without ever becoming knotted or coming undone, and a cast of characters as alive as any on the page, this novel is a masterpiece.” — Robert McDonald, The Book Stall At Chestnut, Winnetka, IL

 

 

 

 

“This is the novel John Boyne was born to write: A brilliant book of identity and redemption, both heartbreaking and humorous, intimate and expansive. Cyril Avery has been constantly reminded he doesn’t belong, first by his adopted parents, then by the church and his country. As we follow him on his journey to acceptance, we are shown the cruelty of fate and the surprising kindness of ordinary people. Boyne perfectly constructs every story told, unveiling the humor and hypocrisy of humanity in each character and illuminating how the arc of Cyril’s story is also the arc of modern times. An amazing feat from the first page to the last.” — Luisa Smith, Book Passage, Corte Madera, CA

These should get me through the next six weeks. How about you – do you see a story you want to read? Or have read recently that you recommend?